tax related

Canada caregiver credit

The information is mainly for people who care for a person with a disability. The CRA administers a number of tax deductions and credits to help persons with disabilities or their families. The Canada caregiver credit (CCC) is a non-refundable tax credit that may be available to you. The CCC combines three previous credits: the caregiver credit, the family caregiver credit, and the credit for infirm dependants age 18 or older. If you previously claimed any or all of these credits and your situation remains the same as in 2016, then your 2017 CCC claim will stay about the same as in 2016. In some cases, your claim may increase. The CCC is a non-refundable credit, it is used to reduce tax owing, but any excess is not refunded.

Who can you claim this credit for?

You may be able to claim the CCC if you support your spouse or common-law partner with a physical or mental impairment.

You may also be able to claim the CCC for one or more of the following individuals if they depend on you for support because of a physical or mental impairment:

  • your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s child or grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s parent, grandparent, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, niece, or nephew (if resident in Canada at any time in the year)

An individual is considered to depend on you for support if they rely on you to regularly and consistently provide them with some or all of the basic necessities of life, such as food, shelter and clothing.

What amount can you claim?

The amount you can claim depends on your relationship to the person for whom you are claiming the CCC, your circumstances, the person’s net income, and whether other credits are being claimed for that person. The below is based on 2018 data.

For your spouse or common-law partner, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 303. You could also claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 304.

For an eligible dependant 18 years of age or older, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 305. You could also claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 304. See Note below.

For an eligible dependant under 18 years of age at the end of the year, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 305 or on line 367 for your child. See Note below.

For each of your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s children under 18 years of age at the end of the year, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 on line 367. See Note below.

For each other dependant 18 years of age or older, who is not an eligible dependant for whom an amount is claimed on line 305, you may be entitled to claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 307.

The maximum total relief available for anyone is up to $1,032.45. That is the max $6,883 multiply by 15%. Important to note, if you make more than 23,046 then you will not be able to claim any amount.

Under the current conditions for the caregiver credit for in-home care, in order to qualify, a dependant has to live with me. Will the dependant have to live with me under the new CCC?

No, under the new CCC, a dependant does not have to live with you, but must be dependent on you for support by reason of infirmity.

What documents do you need to support your claim?

When you file your income tax return, do not send any documents. Keep them in case we ask to see them.

The CRA may ask for a signed statement from a medical practitioner showing when the impairment began and what the duration of the impairment is expected to be.

For children under 18 years of age, the statement should also show that the child, because of the impairment in physical or mental functions, is, and will likely continue to be, dependent on others for an indefinite duration. Dependent on others means they need much more assistance for their personal needs and care compared to children of the same age.

You do not need a signed statement from a medical practitioner if the CRA already has an approved Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for a specified period.

For more information please check the Department of Finance Canada’s Budget 2017 documents for details.

 

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